I took the leather suit
apart so I could run more
stitching down the legs to
approximate more closely
the spacing on the real
suit.  Also, I modified the
gloves from the kit to
make them longer.  I also
modified the cape and
added a scale chain at
the neck.
You can see in the picture above what the mini 12V
transformer looks like, and to the above right, you can see
the exposed bulb and electrical wire running down the length
of it.  For the two pictures to the right, I placed a small red
drinking straw (cut to length of course) over the bulb for the
reddish aura.  In reality it's much redder, but with all the
ambient lights turned off for these photos, the red kind of
blew out in the exposures.  But trust me when I tell you that in
real life, it looks sooooo cooooollll!
David Prowse as "Darth Vader" in STAR WARS, 1977
James Earl Jones as the voice of "Darth Vader"

If you're going to build and collect action figures, you're going to
have heroes and villains.  And if you're going to have villains,
then you've got to have the ultimate villain:  Darth Vader.
Building this figure was relatively simple as it
was kitbashed from two primary sources:  the
terrible electronic Darth Vader by Hasbro (for
the leather suit), and the 1/6 scale Kaiyodo
vinyl kit.  The body is taken from a 13" Snoop
Dogg figure, which I used primarily for its
height:  David Prowse is 6'5" or so in real life I
believe, and so scaled it would be just about 13
inches.
But as I was nearing
completion of this
figure, I discovered
that Medicom of
Japan was about to
release a 1/6 scale
Darth Vader.  From
the pictures, it looks
good, but I wonder if
it would use an
underscaled 12"
body (as did their
Predator, which
should have stood
over 14" tall.)
Still, I didn't want to scrap this
project, regardless of how
good Medicom's figure would
be, so I thought about how to
make this figure worthwhile.  
And then I thought of it:  my
figure would have a working
lightsaber.  This of course is
the most important accessory
for this figure, so I went to
Fry's Electronics and
purchased a 12V miniature
fluorescent bulb, a matching
12V transformer, a 12V
battery, some wire, solder,
etc.
After soldering the parts together, I ran
the wires through the dremeled-out
vinyl glove, through the sleeve and out
the back of the leather outfit.  I had to
adjust the wire lengths to equalize
resistance along each line, but in the
end... presto!  I had a "working" 1/6 light
saber...

Now, to be honest, the pictures above
were Adobe PhotoShopped for the
proper lightsaber effect because to get
a decent exposure of a black figure
against a black background, I had to
use enough lighting to drown out the
effect of the glowing, electrical light
saber.

Below, however, you see some
un-Photoshopped
images...
David Prowse as "Darth Vader" in STAR WARS, 1977
James Earl Jones as the voice of "Darth Vader"

If you're going to build and collect action figures, you're going to
have heroes and villains.  And if you're going to have villains,
then you've got to have the ultimate villain:  Darth Vader.
David Prowse as "Darth Vader" in STAR WARS, 1977
James Earl Jones as the voice of "Darth Vader"

If you're going to build and collect action figures, you're going to
have heroes and villains.  And if you're going to have villains,
then you've got to have the ultimate villain:  Darth Vader.
Building this figure was relatively simple as it
was kitbashed from two primary sources:  the
terrible electronic Darth Vader by Hasbro (for
the leather suit), and the 1/6 scale Kaiyodo
vinyl kit.  The body is taken from a 13" Snoop
Dogg figure, which I used primarily for its
height:  David Prowse is 6'5" or so in real life I
believe, and so scaled it would be just about 13
inches.
Building this figure was relatively simple as it
was kitbashed from two primary sources:  the
terrible electronic Darth Vader by Hasbro (for
the leather suit), and the 1/6 scale Kaiyodo
vinyl kit.  The body is taken from a 13" Snoop
Dogg figure, which I used primarily for its
height:  David Prowse is 6'5" or so in real life I
believe, and so scaled it would be just about 13
inches.
I took the leather suit
apart so I could run more
stitching down the legs to
approximate more closely
the spacing on the real
suit.  Also, I modified the
gloves from the kit to
make them longer.  I also
modified the cape and
added a scale chain at
the neck.
I took the leather suit
apart so I could run more
stitching down the legs to
approximate more closely
the spacing on the real
suit.  Also, I modified the
gloves from the kit to
make them longer.  I also
modified the cape and
added a scale chain at
the neck.
But as I was nearing
completion of this
figure, I discovered
that Medicom of
Japan was about to
release a 1/6 scale
Darth Vader.  From
the pictures, it looks
good, but I wonder if
it would use an
underscaled 12"
body (as did their
Predator, which
should have stood
over 14" tall.)
But as I was nearing
completion of this
figure, I discovered
that Medicom of
Japan was about to
release a 1/6 scale
Darth Vader.  From
the pictures, it looks
good, but I wonder if
it would use an
underscaled 12"
body (as did their
Predator, which
should have stood
over 14" tall.)
Still, I didn't want to scrap this
project, regardless of how
good Medicom's figure would
be, so I thought about how to
make this figure worthwhile.  
And then I thought of it:  my
figure would have a working
lightsaber.  This of course is
the most important accessory
for this figure, so I went to
Fry's Electronics and
purchased a 12V miniature
fluorescent bulb, a matching
12V transformer, a 12V
battery, some wire, solder,
etc.
Still, I didn't want to scrap this
project, regardless of how
good Medicom's figure would
be, so I thought about how to
make this figure worthwhile.  
And then I thought of it:  my
figure would have a working
lightsaber.  This of course is
the most important accessory
for this figure, so I went to
Fry's Electronics and
purchased a 12V miniature
fluorescent bulb, a matching
12V transformer, a 12V
battery, some wire, solder,
etc.
After soldering the parts together, I ran
the wires through the dremeled-out
vinyl glove, through the sleeve and out
the back of the leather outfit.  I had to
adjust the wire lengths to equalize
resistance along each line, but in the
end... presto!  I had a "working" 1/6 light
saber...

Now, to be honest, the pictures above
were Adobe PhotoShopped for the
proper lightsaber effect because to get
a decent exposure of a black figure
against a black background, I had to
use enough lighting to drown out the
effect of the glowing, electrical light
saber.

Below, however, you see some
un-Photoshopped
images...
After soldering the parts together, I ran
the wires through the dremeled-out
vinyl glove, through the sleeve and out
the back of the leather outfit.  I had to
adjust the wire lengths to equalize
resistance along each line, but in the
end... presto!  I had a "working" 1/6 light
saber...

Now, to be honest, the pictures above
were Adobe PhotoShopped for the
proper lightsaber effect because to get
a decent exposure of a black figure
against a black background, I had to
use enough lighting to drown out the
effect of the glowing, electrical light
saber.

Below, however, you see some
un-Photoshopped
images...
You can see in the picture above what the mini 12V
transformer looks like, and to the above right, you can see
the exposed bulb and electrical wire running down the length
of it.  For the two pictures to the right, I placed a small red
drinking straw (cut to length of course) over the bulb for the
reddish aura.  In reality it's much redder, but with all the
ambient lights turned off for these photos, the red kind of
blew out in the exposures.  But trust me when I tell you that in
real life, it looks sooooo cooooollll!
You can see in the picture above what the mini 12V
transformer looks like, and to the above right, you can see
the exposed bulb and electrical wire running down the length
of it.  For the two pictures to the right, I placed a small red
drinking straw (cut to length of course) over the bulb for the
reddish aura.  In reality it's much redder, but with all the
ambient lights turned off for these photos, the red kind of
blew out in the exposures.  But trust me when I tell you that in
real life, it looks sooooo cooooollll!